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Church wedding rental fees steep

Dear Editor:

My son is getting married in November and we’re trying to find a place here in Baker County to have the ceremony. He called a few churches, but they want $800 to $1500 to rent the church, not counting the reception.

This upsets me. My father started a church in Baker County 40 years ago, and has helped a lot of churches in this area. He, Bro. Leslie Thomas, and many other preachers worked together and did a lot of good in this community, and I never knew of them charging for someone to have a wedding in their church.

The Christian Fellowship Temple wants $800, First Baptist Church of Glen (where I was married 27 years ago without charge and where my husband Tommy helped build the church) wants $1500.

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The stop signs to no where

Taber Blvd. signage leading up to the stop signs.The recent positioning of two stop signs at the intersection of Taber Blvd. with two virtually untraveled streets in Glen St. Mary as a way of slowing traffic is, well, not a good solution.

You’ll recall last June the county commission balked at the Glen First Baptist Church’s request to close the road altogether, opening the door to a compromise that recognizes the public’s need to use a well-established right-of-way (10,500 weekly trips by latest count) and the church’s concern for safety.

So we have two stop signs (at Andrews St. which is going to be closed anyway and South Boulevard south of church property) where they are simply not needed, and they’re for safety reasons?

That’s hardly a compromise. It’s overkill, and a needless nuisance to motorists.

Recently the county re-surfaced Taber from US 90 south to CR 125 and placed an elevated walk where church pedestrians cross from buildings on the west side of Taber to the main complex on the east side.

That’s a compromise.

The elevated walkway and clearly marked pedestrian crossing, along with the 25 mph speed limit on Taber, clearly cover the county’s concern protecting churchgoers during Sunday and Wednesday service times, and other events, at the church.

Stop sign placement hundreds of feet either side of the crossing is pointless.

A reasonable addition would be stop signs in both directions at the crosswalk, mounted on rotatable posts that can be turned toward traffic during church and church-activity times.

Motorists would then be required to stop at the crosswalk. The signs, manned by either church volunteers or off-duty deputies as crossing guards, constitute more than adequate diligence to protect pedestrians.

As was pointed out in this column last year, Glen Baptist created the problem by having buildings on both sides of the established right-of-way. The county commission heard from citizens who want Taber to remain open, and support for closure failed to get a seconding motion so it died.

That part, then, is settled.

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Race and country of origin are different

Dear Editor:

In response to the “Impressions” column last week “Put ‘African-American’ in the ash heap,” I beg to differ.

Nationality and race are two concepts used very often by the media. Though the words have totally different meanings, their use has created doubts in the minds of readers. Whereas nationality pertains to the country you were born in, or are in at present, race is the ethnic group you belong to.

The piece of land you were born in decides your nationality, so if your parents moved to another country just before your birth, you may have a new country for your nationality. The word “race” is used mostly in a negative tone these days to refer to discrimination going on in various parts of the world on the basis of skin color and facial features.

It is true that African-Americans, blacks, Negroes, et all have been called by many names over the past 250 years of American history — everything except a “child of God.” But, more to the point of how the term “African-American” entered the lexicon of American dialogue, consider the ethnic groups that comprise our American society.

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Put ‘African-American’ label in the trash heap

Thank you Gibre George.

If you’ll permit a white guy to write about this subject, how pleasing it is to see that some younger black people aren’t fond of the term “African-American” when referring their race.

If a two-word combo ever equaled the sound of long fingernails dragged down a chalkboard, that is it.

An Associated Press article appearing in Monday’s edition of The Florida Times-Union credited Mr. George, who lives in Hollywood, FL, with starting the Facebook page Don’t Call Me African-American. “It just doesn’t sit well with a younger generation of black people,” the 38-year-old entrepreneur was quoted as saying.

Apparently a lot of people agree, and one can only hope that they are black people, both young and old. It’ll have to be blacks themselves who toss this offensive term into the ash heap.

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